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What To Do If You Are Experiencing The Winter Blues

Winter is coming and with it the winter blues. Getting out of bed in the morning is probably one of the least enjoyable tasks of the day. And although winter fatigue might not be a major depression issue, to avoid it triggering a severe depression, you should probably take it seriously.

To take care of your mental health, make sure to take a good look at your life and/or your apartment and think of different ways you can make yourself more comfortable and possibly combat feeling down. Keep reading for a list of tips and tricks to deal with it! But first:

What are the possible symptoms you might be experiencing?

The winter blues are seasonal, and people often start noticing symptoms during autumn. It’s also often abbreviated as SAD (= Seasonal Affective Disorder). Possible symptoms are:

  • Increased tiredness
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of energy
  • A persistent low mood
  • Loss of pleasure or interest in everyday activities
  • Feeling irritable
  • Low self-esteem
  • Feeling stressed or anxious
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Becoming less sociable
  • Sleep more than usual
  • Increased appetite (also cravings for particular foods) 

It is important to note, however, that professionals or doctors only diagnose you with seasonal depression if it is connected to the season, aka the winter months, AND if it’s a yearly occurrence.

What could be the reasons for experiencing seasonal depression?

Seasonal Depression isn’t anything new, it has been known for a long time. “Melancholy occurs in autumn, whereas mania in summer,”. This was written by the Greek philosopher Poseidonios around 100BC, and even Hippocrates wrote of it in 400BC.

Light plays a fundamental role when it comes to our circadian rhythm. Long story short, sunlight prevents the production of melatonin, the hormone which causes us to be sleepy. If you experience a lack of light, due to shorter days during the winter season, with the wintertime change, your circadian rhythm spirals out of control.

In addition to that, melanin is produced by using the neurotransmitter serotonin. This is a problem because serotonin is the key hormone that stabilizes our mood, feelings of well-being, and happiness. It impacts your entire body.

Disclaimer: Always be very careful when you trying to self-diagnose. So if you feel like you might be experiencing (seasonal) depression, you should see a doctor for a professional opinion.

On another note, we’ve gathered a small collection of ideas of things you could try to make yourself feel better. And always remember, with any change, take baby steps!

1. Use Dawn Simulators

These simulators act as alarm clocks, but instead of waking up to the annoying sound of beeping, you wake up naturally. These simulators start with dim light and slowly get brighter and more intense, similar to the sun. You can find all sorts of apps that do this in the app store, so you can try it out before spending money.

2. Get some exercise (preferably outside)

Getting regular exercise has many benefits for mental health. Not only does it relieve stress, improve memory, help sleep better, and boost the overall mood and self-esteem, it can also help relieve depression symptoms.

Furthermore, research shows that maintaining an exercise schedule can prevent you from relapsing.

3. Get enough light

Sometimes doctors prescribe light therapy to help with seasonal depression. Typically, you would sit in front of a lightbox for 30 minutes a day.

But many of us don’t happen to have a lightbox just lying around our apartments – but what we all do have is the sun. Try going outside daily, whether it's for a walk, some exercise, or just to sit outside and breath in the fresh air.

Even on cloudy days, the sun is bright enough to have a positive effect on you.

4. Clean up your sleep hygiene

It seems too easy to just give in to the temptation of sleeping in bed all day long. Instead, set a time you want to go to bed and a time to wake up, and then stick to it. Don’t give up if you don’t succeed straight away, and stay aware of the fact if and how it affects your mood during the day.

5. Cut out alcohol

Having a glass of wine or a beer can be quite relaxing at the moment, but what you might not know is that it’s a depressant. Excessive usage has been linked to SAD, so if you tend to drink a lot of alcohol in your free time, try going without it, you might notice that you feel better after some time.

6. Schedule meeting up with your friends and family

You might not feel like seeing anyone and just want to hibernate at home in your bed with your phone, and we all have moods like that, but socializing is extremely important. Whether it’s just chatting on the phone, grabbing a coffee, or watching a series together, these interactions a few times a week will lift your spirits.

7. Limit the time on your phone

To battle winter fatigue you have to get the right amount of sleep. And scrolling through the phone in the dead of night is not helping that. So try to take some time for yourself – without your phone - in the evening and wind down. Take a bath, do some reading, meditate, journal… Whatever relaxes you. You could even write about how implementing the advice in this post works out for you!

8. If all things fail, speak to a mental health professional.

A doctor will be able to diagnose you properly, and possibly give you new insights or prescribe some medication that could help.

That’s it for this article. If you’re on a roll to create the perfect sleep environment, read these two articles to get some clean sleep. The Science Behind Getting Good Sleep & Habits You Need For Better Sleep.

Check out our collection of memory foam mattresses right here.

Don’t forget that you can use the discount code SweetSleep15 on your next order to get a 15% discount!  

What To Do If You Are Experiencing The Winter Blues

Winter is coming and with it the winter blues. Getting out of bed in the morning is probably one of the least enjoyable tasks of the day. And although winter fatigue might not be a major depression issue, to avoid it triggering a severe depression, you should probably take it seriously.

To take care of your mental health, make sure to take a good look at your life and/or your apartment and think of different ways you can make yourself more comfortable and possibly combat feeling down. Keep reading for a list of tips and tricks to deal with it! But first:

What are the possible symptoms you might be experiencing?

The winter blues are seasonal, and people often start noticing symptoms during autumn. It’s also often abbreviated as SAD (= Seasonal Affective Disorder). Possible symptoms are:

  • Increased tiredness
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of energy
  • A persistent low mood
  • Loss of pleasure or interest in everyday activities
  • Feeling irritable
  • Low self-esteem
  • Feeling stressed or anxious
  • Reduced sex drive
  • Becoming less sociable
  • Sleep more than usual
  • Increased appetite (also cravings for particular foods) 

It is important to note, however, that professionals or doctors only diagnose you with seasonal depression if it is connected to the season, aka the winter months, AND if it’s a yearly occurrence.

What could be the reasons for experiencing seasonal depression?

Seasonal Depression isn’t anything new, it has been known for a long time. “Melancholy occurs in autumn, whereas mania in summer,”. This was written by the Greek philosopher Poseidonios around 100BC, and even Hippocrates wrote of it in 400BC.

Light plays a fundamental role when it comes to our circadian rhythm. Long story short, sunlight prevents the production of melatonin, the hormone which causes us to be sleepy. If you experience a lack of light, due to shorter days during the winter season, with the wintertime change, your circadian rhythm spirals out of control.

In addition to that, melanin is produced by using the neurotransmitter serotonin. This is a problem because serotonin is the key hormone that stabilizes our mood, feelings of well-being, and happiness. It impacts your entire body.

Disclaimer: Always be very careful when you trying to self-diagnose. So if you feel like you might be experiencing (seasonal) depression, you should see a doctor for a professional opinion.

On another note, we’ve gathered a small collection of ideas of things you could try to make yourself feel better. And always remember, with any change, take baby steps!

1. Use Dawn Simulators

These simulators act as alarm clocks, but instead of waking up to the annoying sound of beeping, you wake up naturally. These simulators start with dim light and slowly get brighter and more intense, similar to the sun. You can find all sorts of apps that do this in the app store, so you can try it out before spending money.

2. Get some exercise (preferably outside)

Getting regular exercise has many benefits for mental health. Not only does it relieve stress, improve memory, help sleep better, and boost the overall mood and self-esteem, it can also help relieve depression symptoms.

Furthermore, research shows that maintaining an exercise schedule can prevent you from relapsing.

3. Get enough light

Sometimes doctors prescribe light therapy to help with seasonal depression. Typically, you would sit in front of a lightbox for 30 minutes a day.

But many of us don’t happen to have a lightbox just lying around our apartments – but what we all do have is the sun. Try going outside daily, whether it's for a walk, some exercise, or just to sit outside and breath in the fresh air.

Even on cloudy days, the sun is bright enough to have a positive effect on you.

4. Clean up your sleep hygiene

It seems too easy to just give in to the temptation of sleeping in bed all day long. Instead, set a time you want to go to bed and a time to wake up, and then stick to it. Don’t give up if you don’t succeed straight away, and stay aware of the fact if and how it affects your mood during the day.

5. Cut out alcohol

Having a glass of wine or a beer can be quite relaxing at the moment, but what you might not know is that it’s a depressant. Excessive usage has been linked to SAD, so if you tend to drink a lot of alcohol in your free time, try going without it, you might notice that you feel better after some time.

6. Schedule meeting up with your friends and family

You might not feel like seeing anyone and just want to hibernate at home in your bed with your phone, and we all have moods like that, but socializing is extremely important. Whether it’s just chatting on the phone, grabbing a coffee, or watching a series together, these interactions a few times a week will lift your spirits.

7. Limit the time on your phone

To battle winter fatigue you have to get the right amount of sleep. And scrolling through the phone in the dead of night is not helping that. So try to take some time for yourself – without your phone - in the evening and wind down. Take a bath, do some reading, meditate, journal… Whatever relaxes you. You could even write about how implementing the advice in this post works out for you!

8. If all things fail, speak to a mental health professional.

A doctor will be able to diagnose you properly, and possibly give you new insights or prescribe some medication that could help.

That’s it for this article. If you’re on a roll to create the perfect sleep environment, read these two articles to get some clean sleep. The Science Behind Getting Good Sleep & Habits You Need For Better Sleep.

Check out our collection of memory foam mattresses right here.

Don’t forget that you can use the discount code SweetSleep15 on your next order to get a 15% discount!